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Homeland Security News

A collection of open-source homeland security and terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: homeland security

An Atlanta man faces up to five years in prison after admitting he attempted to hide firearms in an overseas shipment of goods.

Shawn Sabi, 34, of Atlanta, pled guilty in U.S. District Court to an Information charging him with Submitting False or Misleading Export Information, said David H. Estes, Acting U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Georgia. The plea subjects Sabi to a possible statutory sentence of up to five years in prison followed by two years of supervised release and a $10,000 fine. There is no parole in the federal system.

“With massive numbers of shipments moving daily through the Port of Savannah, our law enforcement partners perform stellar work in intercepting illegal materials moving through commerce,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Estes. “When these shipments are detected, we will hold those attempting such criminal acts accountable.”

In March, agents from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) detained Sabi’s shipment, labeled “115 pieces used household goods and personal effects,” based on discrepancies in declarations filed for the shipment. An agent from the U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) reviewed the records, leading to a search of the container in which a shotgun, a rifle, and three handguns were discovered concealed inside the legs of an aluminum shelving unit, along with ammunition and other materials.

Read more: Department of Justice

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) is ahead of the pack when it comes to ensuring that the food we eat and our agricultural supply are safe. An attack on our food supply—whether from intentional tampering, or due to contagious animal disease—could be dangerous to human health and could cause long-lasting economic impacts.

For S&T, food defense is a critical aspect of protecting the nation and our citizens. It is why S&T is working with partners across DHS and other federal agencies to ensure every step in the food supply chain is safe and secure—from farms, where crops and livestock are grown, to manufacturing facilities, where food products are processed, packaged, and then distributed to stores, and on to Americans’ kitchen tables. To achieve this, S&T is developing resources such as risk assessments to help the sector focus on the highest risk areas, so we can trust that the food we eat is safe, especially during a pandemic. These resources include developing tools for preventing and securing food from intentional adulteration during processing, developing animal disease vaccines and detection tools, and studying and characterizing toxic chemicals and pathogens that can contaminate food.

Read more: Homeland Security Today

Republicans sought to rewrite the history of the Jan. 6 insurrection during a rancorous congressional hearing Wednesday, painting the Trump supporters who attacked the building as mostly peaceful patriots and downplaying repeatedly the violence of the day.

Democrats, meanwhile, clashed with Donald Trump’s former Pentagon chief about the unprepared government response to a riot that began when hundreds of Trump loyalists bent on overturning the election broke through police barriers, smashed windows and laid siege to the building.

The colliding lines of questioning, and a failure to settle on a universally agreed-upon set of facts, underscored the challenges Congress faces as it sets out to investigate the violence and government missteps. The House Oversight Committee hearing unfolded just after Republicans in the chamber voted to remove Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership post for rebuking Trump for his false claims of election fraud and his role in inciting the attack.

Read more: AP

The Department of Homeland Security has begun implementing a strategy to gather and analyze intelligence about security threats from public social media posts, DHS officials said.

The goal is to build a warning system to detect the sort of posts that appeared to predict an attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 but were missed or ignored by law enforcement and intelligence agencies, the officials said.

The focus is not on the identity of the posters but rather on gleaning insights about potential security threats based on emerging narratives and grievances. So far, DHS is using human beings, not computer algorithms, to make sense of the data, the officials said.

"We're not looking at who are the individual posters," said a senior official involved in the effort. "We are looking at what narratives are resonating and spreading across platforms. From there you may be able to determine what are the potential targets you need to protect."

Read more: NBC News

Law enforcement sources have identified the armed man who was shot outside Central Intelligence Agency headquarters Monday evening.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation says Roy Gordon Cole died after being taken to a local hospital.

Sources told FOX 5's Tom Fitzgerald that Cole had a long history of mental illness, and was known to CIA security.

According to the FBI, Cole emerged from a vehicle with a weapon and was "engaged by law enforcement officers" around 6 p.m.

Read more: Fox 5 (DC)