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Homeland Security News

A collection of open-source homeland security and terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Jun 8, 2021

Italian police announced on Monday they had broken up an online neo-Nazi group dedicated to antisemitic and racist propaganda that encouraged young people to carry out extreme acts of violence against Jews and foreigners.

Italian postal police and Carabinieri paramilitary police said individuals aged between 26 and 62 were allegedly involved in the group.

Twelve people were present on Facebook and Russian social network VK under the name, "Ordine Ario Romano," which is believed to be a reference to the racist writings of fascist author Julius Evola, a Carabinieri police statement said.

The group's social media postings were "inspired by Nazi, antisemitic and Holocaust-denial ideologies, as well as by anti-Jewish conspiracy theories," the statement added.

Read more: Deutsche Welle

For nearly three weeks Belgium's leading virologist has been living in a safehouse with his wife and 12-year-old son, guarded by security agents.

While scientists across the world have come under attack throughout the pandemic, the threat to Prof Marc Van Ranst is more serious than most.

He has been targeted by a far-right rogue soldier, Jürgen Conings, who has a vendetta for virologists and Covid lockdowns. The military shooting instructor went on the run with rocket launcher and a machine gun, and Belgian police cannot find him.

"The threat was very real," Prof Van Ranst tells me from his safehouse, as he relives the night he and his family were moved into hiding on 18 May.

Read more: BBC News

Police arrested a Bountiful man on Sunday after he allegedly plotted to kill several people with firearms and explosives and tried to enlist a co-conspirator, according to charging documents.

Robert Jack Turville, 62, allegedly tried to engage a co-worker at a Midvale sporting goods store to help him kill five people, including with explosives planted in vehicle headrests, a Unified Police Department probable cause statement said.

Unified Police detective Ken Hansen said Monday the co-worker secretly recorded the alleged threats and criminal solicitation. That employee contacted police on Friday, Hansen said.

“With the nature of the threats being so specific, it required a lot of urgency,” Hansen said of the investigation. “We’ve had four detectives on this since Friday, just to make sure, because there was a big concern for the potential victims.”

Read more: Standard-Examiner (Ogden, UT)

A Senate investigation of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol has uncovered broad government, military and law enforcement missteps surrounding the violent attack, including a breakdown within multiple intelligence agencies and a lack of training and preparation for Capitol Police officers who were quickly overwhelmed by the rioters.

The Senate report released Tuesday is the first — and could be the last — bipartisan review of how hundreds of former President Donald Trump’s supporters were able to violently push past security lines and break into the Capitol that day, interrupting the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory.

It includes new details about the police officers on the front lines who suffered chemical burns, brain injuries and broken bones and who told senators that they were left with no direction when command systems broke down. It recommends immediate changes to give the Capitol Police chief more authority, to provide better planning and equipment for law enforcement and to streamline intelligence gathering among federal agencies.

Read more: AP

The federal government has recovered millions of dollars in cryptocurrency paid in ransom to cybercriminals whose attack prompted the shutdown of the country's largest fuel pipeline and gas shortages across the southeastern U.S. last month, the Department of Justice announced Monday.

On May 8, Colonial Pipeline paid a ransom worth roughly $4.3 million in bitcoin to the Russia-based hacking group known as DarkSide, which had used malicious software to hold the company hostage. Colonial Pipeline CEO Joseph Blount told The Wall Street Journal that the company paid the pricey ransom because the company feared a prolonged shutdown and did not know how long it would take to restore operations.

The ransom allowed Colonial to restore fuel transport through its pipeline, which stretches from Texas to the Northeast and delivers 45% of all fuel consumed on the East Coast.

Read more: CBS News