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Homeland Security News

A collection of open-source homeland security and terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Nov 9, 2021

A man shot by police, after he threatened several people with a knife. has died. 

A policeman was also injured as the officers tried to arrest the attacker in the capital’s Bislett neighbourhood, police told a press conference.

No details about the identity of the attacker or his motive were disclosed.

“We’re not excluding any motives, but there is nothing at this stage that indicates this is a terror attack,” police inspector Egil Jorgen Brekke told reporters.

According to tabloid VG, the man was Russian and in his 30s, and had been sentenced to psychiatric care in December 2020 after stabbing a man in Oslo in 2019.

Footage posted by witnesses on social media and broadcast by Norwegiann media show the bare-chested suspect wielding a large knife on the pavement outside a shop.

Read more: The Local (Norway)

Nearly four dozen people in New Jersey have been hit with terrorism charges as part of the state’s campaign to criminalize threats of COVID-19 transmission.

If convicted, the 45 people could each face up to 10 years of prison time and a $150,000 fine, in what defence attorneys of the accused have called a “miscarriage of justice” targeting the poorest and most vulnerable residents of the state.

Denise Lewis, 28, told the Guardian she had been arrested while walking on the streets in April 2020, with warrants related to failure to pay traffic tickets and an incident in which she had “escaped” from a police vehicle.

She had been a witness to a fight but left the back of the patrol car, her attorney Logan Terry told the Guardian.

Read more: National Post (Canada)

A man who allegedly participated in the Capitol riot Jan. 6 and is wanted by the FBI is now seeking asylum in Belarus, the country’s state media reported Monday, presenting him as a “simple American whose shops were burned by Black Lives Matter activists.”

Evan Neumann, who appears to have sat down for an interview with Belarusian state television in a segment titled “Goodbye, America,” is wanted in the United States on charges of violent entry and disorderly conduct on the Capitol grounds, as well as for assaulting, resisting and obstructing law enforcement during civil disorder.

Both Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko and his close ally, Russian President Vladimir Putin, have frequently referenced the Capitol riot, calling the prosecution of those involved an example of “double standards” by the United States because it frequently criticizes crackdowns on anti-government protests abroad.

Read more: Washington Post

A security official from the Iran-backed Kataib Hezbollah group in Iraq dismissed suggestions on Sunday that Iraqi groups were behind the attack on Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi.

"According to our confirmed information, no-one in Iraq has the desire to waste a drone on the house of a former prime minister," Abu Ali Al-Askari said on Telegram.

Kataib Hezbollah and other Iran-aligned militias in Iraq are among the groups that are hostile to Kadhimi.

Read more: Reuters

A metallurgist in the US state of Washington has pleaded guilty to fraud after she spent decades faking the results of strength tests on steel that was being used to make Navy submarines.

Prosecutors say Elaine Marie Thomas, 67, gave false positive readings for strength and toughness tests in at least 240 cases between 1985 and 2017.

Authorities did not disclose which vessels were affected.

But there was no indication that any submarine hulls had failed.

Ms Thomas, of Auburn, Washington, was the director of metallurgy at a foundry in Tacoma that supplied steel castings used by Navy contractors to make submarine hulls, the US Attorney's Office for the Western District of Washington said in a statement.

The foundry was acquired by the manufacturer Bradken in 2008, according to the indictment. There was no evidence that the company's management was aware of the fraud until May 2017. At that time, prosecutors say, a lab employee found out that test cards had been altered and that other discrepancies existed in the records.

Read more: BBC News