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Critical Infrastructure News

Researchers with cybersecurity company SentinelOne reconstructed the recent cyberattack on Iran's train system in a new report, uncovering a new threat actor -- which they named 'MeteorExpresss' -- and a never-before-seen wiper.

On July 9, local news outlets began reporting on a cyberattack targeting the Iranian train system, with hackers defacing display screens in train stations by asking passengers to call '64411', the phone number of Iranian Supreme Leader Khamenei's office. 

Train services were disrupted and just one day later, hackers took down the website of Iran's transport ministry. According to Reuters, the ministry's portal and sub-portal sites went down after the attack targeted computers at the Ministry of Roads and Urban Development

Read more: ZD Net

Protection of our Nation’s critical infrastructure is a responsibility of the government at the Federal, State, local, Tribal, and territorial levels and of the owners and operators of that infrastructure.  The cybersecurity threats posed to the systems that control and operate the critical infrastructure on which we all depend are among the most significant and growing issues confronting our Nation.  The degradation, destruction, or malfunction of systems that control this infrastructure could cause significant harm to the national and economic security of the United States.

Read more: The White House

A leak at a chemical plant in Texas late Tuesday killed two people, and injured dozens, in what local authorities are describing as a “mass casualty incident.”

The leak of acetic acid, a food preservative that is commonly used to make vinegar and can be flammable, occurred 7:35 p.m. Tuesday at the LyondellBasell facility, which is the world’s third-largest producer of the acid, according to the company.

The facility is part of the company’s La Porte Complex, about 25 miles east of Houston, which also manufactures plastics and other chemicals used in paint, toys and food packaging.

Harris County Fire Marshal Laurie Christensen said at a news conference Tuesday night that two people had died at the scene.

Read more: The Washington Post

Critical pipeline operators have reported more than 220 cybersecurity incidents since the Transportation Security Administration implemented emergency measures in the wake of the crippling ransomware attack on one of America's most important pipelines, according to TSA Administrator David Pekoske.

Companies have been reporting incidents since day one of the agency's May 28 security directive aimed at critical pipelines, Pekoske told CNN in an interview. Reporting of cybersecurity incidents has ramped up since the directive, according to Pekoske, who said the reports will help TSA understand the risks facing the industry. Prior to the directive, reporting was voluntary.

TSA issued its first cybersecurity directive following the ransomware incident at Colonial Pipeline, which prompted the shutdown of operations and led to several days of panic gasoline buying and shortages throughout the East Coast.

The directive includes a requirement for around 100 critical pipeline companies to report cybersecurity incidents to the Department of Homeland Security's cybersecurity agency within 12 hours, a DHS official previously said. TSA has unique authority over the surface transportation industry, which includes more than 2.7 million miles of natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines, allowing the agency to regulate the industry.

Read more: CNN

American Airlines and other carriers are facing possible fuel shortages at some airports, industry representatives said.

American told its pilots to conserve fuel by using a single engine while taxiing if the plane allows for that, the airline said.

“We are aware of fuel supply issues at some airports, predominantly across the western U.S., affecting a number of carriers,” American said in a statement Monday. It said the airline has had “minimal operational impact” so far.

The company said the issue was largely caused by a shortage of truck drivers and fuel trucks, and in some cases, pipeline allocations also are contributing to the issue. It said it has not had to cancel flights.

Read more: The Washington Post