Critical pipeline operators have reported more than 220 cybersecurity incidents since the Transportation Security Administration implemented emergency measures in the wake of the crippling ransomware attack on one of America's most important pipelines, according to TSA Administrator David Pekoske.

Companies have been reporting incidents since day one of the agency's May 28 security directive aimed at critical pipelines, Pekoske told CNN in an interview. Reporting of cybersecurity incidents has ramped up since the directive, according to Pekoske, who said the reports will help TSA understand the risks facing the industry. Prior to the directive, reporting was voluntary.

TSA issued its first cybersecurity directive following the ransomware incident at Colonial Pipeline, which prompted the shutdown of operations and led to several days of panic gasoline buying and shortages throughout the East Coast.

The directive includes a requirement for around 100 critical pipeline companies to report cybersecurity incidents to the Department of Homeland Security's cybersecurity agency within 12 hours, a DHS official previously said. TSA has unique authority over the surface transportation industry, which includes more than 2.7 million miles of natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines, allowing the agency to regulate the industry.

Read more: CNN