Skip Navigation

Critical Infrastructure News

The US government has spent the past week assessing a report of a leak at a Chinese nuclear power plant, after a French company that part owns and helps operate it warned of an "imminent radiological threat," according to US officials and documents reviewed by CNN.

The warning included an accusation that the Chinese safety authority was raising the acceptable limits for radiation detection outside the Taishan Nuclear Power Plant in Guangdong province in order to avoid having to shut it down, according to a letter from the French company to the US Department of Energy obtained by CNN.

Read more: CNN

Taiwanese officials are fretting about whether a severe outbreak of Covid-19 could jeopardize the island's critical role in the global semiconductor supply chain. But there's another threat to the industry that experts worry may have even more drastic consequences: the climate crisis.

Taiwan — which accounts for more than half of the world's output of chips — has been grappling for months with its worst drought in more than 50 years, an event experts say could become more frequent due to the effects of climate change.

"There is clearly pressure in the semiconductor industry," wrote Mark Williams, chief Asia economist at Capital Economics, on Thursday in a note that referenced the water shortages and coronavirus cases, along with rolling power outages.

Manufacturers around the world have already had trouble securing supplies of semiconductors, delaying the production and delivery of goods. If Taiwan is hit hard, the situation could become much worse, given the island's importance in contributing to global chips supply.

Read More: CNN Business

A fire at an electrical substation in Puerto Rico has knocked out power to hundreds of thousands throughout the island, utility company LUMA Energy said Thursday.

"The fire caused major blackouts across the entire island. The situation is under assessment and work is being done to restore the system," LUMA Energy tweeted, stating that restoration efforts will continue overnight.

About 400,000 customers in Puerto Rico were without power as of late Thursday, LUMA Energy said, which is more than 1 in 10 residents on the island.

The fire broke out in a transformer at LUMA's Monacillos substation, the company said. Personnel from the Puerto Rico Police, Fire Department and Medical Emergencies are at the scene and no injuries have been reported.

Calling it an explosion, Gov. Pedro Pierluisi said that both state and federal law enforcement authorities are investigating the cause.

Read more: CNN

DHS’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis (I&A) and the Center for Prevention Programs and Partnerships (CP3) provide a resource to raise awareness of potential risk factors and indicators for targeted violence in schools, raise awareness of the likelihood that students may have been exposed to multiple risk factors during the COVID-19 pandemic, and provide resources to become an engaged bystander as part of a comprehensive local prevention framework.

DHS I&A and CP3 believe that the threat of targeted violence in schools will remain elevated as more children return to school full-time. Even after this elevated threat subsides, prevention of targeted violence should remain a key goal of schools and the communities in which they are located.

Read more: HSToday

JBS, the largest beef supplier in the world, paid the ransomware hackers who breached its computer networks about $11 million, the company said Wednesday.

The company was hacked in May by REvil, one of a number of Russian-speaking hacker gangs, leading meat plants across the U.S. and Australia to shut down for at least a day. News of the payment was first reported by The Wall Street Journal.

Like many other ransomware groups, REvil has made millions in recent years by hacking organizations, encrypting their files and demanding fees, often large bitcoin payments, in exchange for a decryptor program and a promise not to leak the files to the public.

In a statement, JBS indicated that while it was able to get most of its systems running without REvil's help, it chose to pay to keep its files safe.

Read more: NBC News