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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: worldwide terrorism threats & trends

Afghan Taliban insurgents are battling fighters loyal to Islamic State over control of territory in eastern Afghanistan in some of the heaviest clashes over the past year between the rival militants, officials said on Wednesday.

The fighting erupted on Monday in two districts of the eastern Afghan border province of Nangarhar, when Islamic State fighters attacked villages under Taliban control.

“Islamic State fighters have captured six villages in Khogyani and Shirzad districts but the fighting has not stopped,” said Sohrab Qaderi, a member Nangarhar’s the provincial council.

Read more: Reuters

Standing under a black flag of the Islamic State, eight men declare their loyalty to the group’s leader, Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi.

“We pledge allegiance ... and to obey him on everything either in easy or difficult conditions,” they say, before praising Allah.

IS claims the men in the video, released late on Tuesday by its AMAQ news agency, carried out the Easter Sunday suicide bombings in Sri Lanka that killed more than 350 people in churches and luxury hotels, the deadliest such attack in South Asia’s history.

Only one man from the video has his face uncovered: his name was Mohamed Zahran.

Read more: Reuters

The Northern Ireland Police Service said Tuesday they have arrested a woman under the Terrorism Act in connection with the slaying of journalist Lyra McKee.

The arrest of the 57-year-old under the Terrorism Act came as an Irish Republican Army splinter group admitted that one of its "volunteers" killed journalist McKee, who was shot dead while reporting on rioting in Londonderry.

In a statement issued Tuesday to the Irish News, the New IRA offered "full and sincere" apologies to McKee's family and friends.

The group said the 29-year-old journalist was killed during Thursday night's unrest "while standing beside enemy forces" — a reference to the police.

Read more: ABC News

A Sri Lankan government official says coordinated suicide bombings in the island nation on Easter Sunday, which killed more than 320 people, were carried out in retaliation for last month's mass shooting at mosques in New Zealand.

State minister for defense, Ruwan Wijewardene, said the attacks were carried out by two Islamist organizations. As NPR's Lauren Frayer reports, "it's not immediately clear how he knows that – whether the information comes from suspects being interrogated, or evidence the suicide bombers may have left behind."

One of the organizations is a little-known radical Islamist group named National Thowfeek Jamaath. Health Minister Rajitha Senaratne has called for the top police official to resign after failing to stop the attacks despite receiving reports that the group was planning to target churches, The Washington Post reports.

Read more: NPR

The Sri Lankan government has admitted it failed to act on multiple warnings before a coordinated series of attacks ripped through churches and hotels on Easter Sunday, and said it feared an international terror group might have been behind the atrocities.

A government spokesman, Rajitha Senaratne, said multiple warnings were received in the days before the attacks, which killed 290 people and injured at least 500 more. CNN understands that at least one warning referred to Nations Thawahid Jaman (NTJ), a little-known local Islamist group which has previously defaced Buddhist statues.

Senaratne, who is also health minister, said he did not believe a local group could have acted alone. "There must be a wider international network behind it," he said.

Read more: CNN