Skip Navigation

Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: policy support

Hezbollah hit back against U.S. condemnation of its role in Lebanon on Thursday, calling it a “violation of sovereignty”, after the United States expressed concern over the organisation’s expanding influence.

After meeting Lebanon’s prime minister on Tuesday, the U.S. ambassador said the United States was worried about the “growing role” in the cabinet of Hezbollah, an armed Shi’ite group backed by Iran and listed as a terrorist organisation by Washington.

“The negative American position on Hezbollah, and which American ambassadors are eager to repeat after meeting any official in Lebanon, is rejected and condemned,” Hezbollah’s lawmakers said in a statement.

Read more: Reuters

A judge has ruled police and court records in a criminal case against an Arizona man facing a terrorism charge must be made available to the media.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Sally Duncan ruled Tuesday the probable-cause statement should be released as soon as possible with other records available by Friday.

Several media organizations challenged county Attorney’s Office efforts to seal a probable-cause statement, a police report, 911 calls and footage of the incident that led to 18-year-old Ismail Hamed’s Jan. 7 arrest.

County sheriff’s officials say Hamed told a dispatcher he had an affiliation with a terror group.

Read more: KGUN (Tucson, Arizona)

A new survey has found rising concerns about climate change, the "Islamic State" and cyberattacks. But more people now see US power and influence as a threat, marking a significant rise from only two years ago.

A 26-country survey published on Monday found that a majority of countries see climate change "as the top international threat." Terrorism, especially the kind perpetrated by the "Islamic State" militant group, came up as the second-highest threat, topping security concerns in eight of the countries surveyed in the Pew Research Center study.

China's power and influence was at the bottom of the threat list, which included cyberattacks, North Korea's nuclear program and the condition of the global economy. Meanwhile, more people now believe US power and influence is a major threat to their country compared to similar surveys conducted in 2013 and 2017.

Read more: Deutsche Welle

U.S. counter-terrorism missions will soon place more emphasis on a little-known Pentagon program designed to help “surrogate forces,” rather than traditional allied units that are dependent on U.S. training, advice and assistance.

The shift comes as the Defense Department implements the 2018 National Defense Strategy, which prioritizes near-peer adversaries like China and Russia ahead of violent extremist organizations like the Islamic State.

“This evolving counter-terrorism [CT] operation construct will place even greater emphasis on successful programs, such as the 127 Echo program, which provides us viable surrogate forces designed to achieve U.S. CT objectives at relatively low cost in terms of resources and especially risk to our personnel,” Maj. Gen. James Hecker, vice director for operations from the joint staff, said during a congressional testimony Wednesday.

Read more: Military Times

President Trump plans to keep United States troops in Iraq to monitor and maintain pressure on neighboring Iran, committing to an American military presence in the region’s war zones even as he moves to withdraw forces from Syria and Afghanistan.

“I want to be able to watch Iran,” Mr. Trump said in an interview aired Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.” “We’re going to keep watching and we’re going to keep seeing and if there’s trouble, if somebody is looking to do nuclear weapons or other things, we’re going to know it before they do.”

Mr. Trump’s comments come as the United States has quietly been negotiating with Iraq for weeks to allow perhaps hundreds of American commandos and support troops now operating in Syria to shift to bases in Iraq and strike the Islamic State from there. Military leaders are seeking to maintain pressure on the militant group as the president fundamentally reorders policy toward Syria and toward Afghanistan, where peace talks with the Taliban are underway.

Read more: New York Times