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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: domestic extremist threats & trends

“Lone Wolf” would-be bomber Jose Pimentel was sentenced to 16 years in prison Tuesday in Manhattan Supreme Court following his guilty plea last month to attempted criminal possession of a weapon in the first degree as a crime of terrorism.  The Al Qaeda sympathizer — who spoke to an informant about his plans to attack law enforcement, American soldiers and Jews — was in court but was glum looking as he sat before the judge at his brief sentencing.

It was a far cry from his Feb. 19 appearance when he flashed a sick grin as prosecutors read aloud his disturbing terror plans.  Pimentel quietly said “no” Tuesday when he was offered the chance to speak before he was brought back to his holding cell, on the way to serving a stiff state prison sentence.  Authorities said he had nearly completed a powerful pipe bomb when he was busted in his Harlem apartment in November 2011.  “Local law enforcement is not only uniquely situated to identify threats of terrorism — we are ready and able to stop acts of terrorism before they occur,” Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. said in a statement.

Read more: New York Daily News

A 20-year-old Florida man pleaded guilty on Wednesday to conspiring to travel to the Middle East to join an al Qaeda-affiliated terrorist group and receive military training as part of a holy war, or jihad.  Shelton Thomas Bell admitted he recruited an unnamed juvenile and the two flew to the Middle East in 2012 with the intention of joining the Ansar al-Sharia group, according to his plea agreement.

The two traveled to Amman, Jordan, in an effort to reach Yemen but were deported by Jordan to the United States.  "If you ask me if was going for jihad in Yemen, I say yes," Bell told federal agents when he returned, according to a statement from prosecutors.

Read more:  Reuters

A National Guard private from California was arrested trying to cross the U.S. border into Canada on Sunday and charged with attempting to travel to Syria to join al Qaeda and fight for "Allah's Army." The criminal complaint against Nicholas Teausant also alleges he discussed a potential strike against the Los Angeles subway system with a confidential source. Teausant, 20, was arrested without incident on a bus in Blaine, Wash., according to the U.S. Attorney's office in Sacramento, Calif. Prosecutors charge that Teausant, a student at San Joaquin Delta Community College in Stockton, Calif., headed north "with the intent of continuing to travel to Syria to join the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, a foreign terrorist organization more widely known as al Qaeda in Iraq."

Authorities first learned of Teausant 10 months ago when he was a member of the Army National Guard's 118th Maintenance Company in Stockton, the complaint said. At the time of his arrest, he was in the process of being released from the service, but was still officially classified as "Trainee Unassigned" with the rank of private.

 
Read more: NBCNews

 

America's most wanted domestic terrorism suspect -- an alleged animal rights extremist -- may be hiding in Hawaii.  FBI agents are hunting for Daniel Andreas San Diego on the state's Big Island after receiving "credible intelligence" that he might be there.  Agents are focusing on the island's eastern district of Puna and in the small, eclectic town of Pahoa, the FBI office in San Francisco announced Wednesday.

San Diego, 36, is suspected to be an animal rights extremist. He is charged with exploding pipe bombs in front of two San Francisco Bay Area companies with ties to a lab that conducted animal experiments.  San Diego is atop the FBI's list of most-wanted domestic terrorists, and the agency is offering a $250,000 reward for information leading to his arrest.  Kai Sorte, who manages an organic deli in Pahoa, said FBI agents had visited the small, counter-cultural town about 18 months ago in search of San Diego. Sorte said he was interviewed again Monday and said FBI agents believe San Diego is looking for "some sort of cause or movement" to join.

Read more: Seattle Times

A dispatcher at Los Angeles International Airport couldn't immediately send police to a shooting last year because the emergency phone system didn't provide a location, according to an investigation that also found broken panic buttons that are supposed to quickly call for help.

A screening supervisor picked up the "red phone" seconds after shots were fired in the sprawling airport's Terminal 3 last Nov. 1, but she fled as the gunman approached with his high-powered rifle. Because no one was on the other end of the line to provide details and no location information was included with the call, the dispatcher was helpless, according to two officials briefed on preliminary findings of a review of the emergency response.

They spoke only on condition of anonymity because the final report won't be released until next month. One of the officials likened the situation to a 911 call with police not knowing what address to go to. Airport dispatchers knew something was wrong but didn't know where to send help because the system didn't identify the locations of its emergency phones.

Read more: AP