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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: domestic extremist threats & trends

New York officials are looking for a naturalised US citizen who was born in Afghanistan for questioning over Saturday's blast in the Chelsea area in which 29 people were injured.

The suspect has been named as Ahmad Khan Rahami, aged 28.

Early on Monday, a backpack containing up to five devices exploded in Elizabeth, New Jersey, when a bomb disposal robot tried to deactivate it.  The suspect's last known address was in Elizabeth.  FBI officials were searching a residence in the New Jersey city on Monday.

Investigators have warned that the suspect should be considered "armed and dangerous".

"Anyone who sees this individual or knows anything about him or his whereabouts needs to call it in right away," New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said on CNN.

Read more:  BBC News

An explosive device left near a train station in Elizabeth, New Jersey, blew up early on Monday when a bomb squad robot cut a wire on the mechanism, one of as many as five potential bombs found at the site, officials said.

No one was injured in the blast that followed a series of attacks in the United States over the weekend, including a Saturday night bombing that hurt 29 people in Manhattan.

The device in Elizabeth, a city south of Newark, had been left in a backpack placed in a trash can near a train station and a bar, Mayor Christian Bollwage told reporters.

As many as five potential explosive devices tumbled out of the backpack when it was emptied, Bollwage said. After cordoning off the area, a bomb squad used a robot to cut a wire to try to disable the device, but inadvertently set off an explosion, he said.

"I can imagine that if all five of them went off at the same time, that the loss of life could have been enormous if there was an event going on,” Bollwage said.

Bomb technicians from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Union County and New Jersey were involved in the operation that resulted in the detonation of the object, one of multiple explosive devices at the site, the FBI confirmed on Twitter.

Read more:  Reuters

At least 29 people have been injured in an explosion in a crowded district of New York City.  The cause of the blast late on Saturday in Chelsea remains unclear. Mayor Bill de Blasio described it as "intentional" but said that there were no known links to terror.

The force of the blast blew out windows and could be heard several blocks away.  Another device, reportedly a pressure cooker rigged with wires, was later found in the same district.

None of the injuries is life-threatening but one is serious, New York's fire commissioner said.  Most of those hurt suffered cuts and other minor injuries from glass and other debris. 

The explosion occurred around 21:00 (01:00 GMT on Sunday). Witnesses said people ran in all directions following the "incredibly loud" blast.  Unconfirmed reports said the blast went off in a dustbin. Several blocks have been closed down by police.  "The initial indications is this was an intentional act," Mr de Blasio said.

But he added: "We also want to be upfront saying that there is no evidence at this point of a terror connection to this incident."

Read more:  BBC News

A pipe bomb exploded in a New Jersey beach town on Saturday along the route of a charity race to benefit military veterans, but no injuries were reported in what investigators were treating as a possible act of terrorism.

The explosive device went off in a trash can about 30 minutes after the scheduled start of the race, which coincidentally was delayed, in Seaside Park, a resort about 80 miles (129 km) south of New York City, officials said.

No damage to surrounding structures was reported, and no runners or bystanders were in close proximity to the 9:30 a.m. blast, so no one was hurt, authorities said.

Even so, the explosion stirred dark memories of the bomb blasts at the finish line of the Boston Marathon in 2013 that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation's so-called joint terrorism task force assumed the lead role in searching for clues to Saturday's bombing, asking members of the public for any tips that might lead to arrests in the case.

The race, dubbed the Seaside Semper Five 5K, was immediately canceled, and authorities closed the beach and several surrounding blocks while evacuating dozens of nearby homes as a search for more devices ensued.

Initial reports of a second bomb planted in another trash proved untrue, according to a statement issued by New Jersey state police several hours later.

Read more:  Reuters

A meeting about lifting a moratorium on construction plans for the first-ever mosque in a quaint Georgia county was canceled this week after officials discovered a video in which a self-described militia group threatened violence.

The video was filmed at a church across from the site of the proposed mosque and Islamic cemetery in Covington, an Atlanta suburb. The video's creator, Chris Hill, 42, told NBC News he shot it while a protest was going on over the weekend.

"I was just shooting from the hip is what I was doing, and saying, 'Right over there, this is going to be a future ISIS training group. This is where you're going to see terrorism taking hold in Newton County.' It's tied to terrorism, everything from 9/11 to Boston bombings to the Fort Hood shooting, to the coup in Turkey. It's all connected," Hill, a Marine veteran who's now a paralegal living in McDonough, Georgia, told NBC News.

Read more: NBC News