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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: domestic extremist threats & trends

On the morning of April 19, 1995, a man parked a rental truck packed with explosives in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. At 9:02 a.m., the explosives detonated, killing 168 people, including 19 children. This wasn't the work of a foreign terrorist group. Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, former U.S. Army soldiers, were convicted of the attack. McVeigh was executed in 2001, and Nichols is serving a life sentence.

Twenty years later, domestic terror threats range from white supremacists to eco-terrorists to anti-government extremists and radical separatist groups, according to the FBI. The FBI's goal, of course, is to prevent "homegrown attacks" before they happen. Unfortunately, this isn't always possible. When acts of domestic terror do occur, the FBI investigates and tries to catch those responsible. From McVeigh and Nichols to Eric Rudolph to Ted Kaczynski, the FBI is often successful, but every once in a while, the suspects get away.

These are the FBI's most-wanted domestic terrorist fugitives:

  • Donna Joan Borup
  • Cheri Laverne Dalton
  • Leo Frederick Burt
  • Joseph Mamoud Dibee
  • Josephine Sunshine Overaker
  • Elizabeth Anna Duke
  • William "Guillermo" Morales
  • Catherine Marie Kerkow

Read more: CNN

The bomb went off just after 3:30 a.m. in the heart of Times Square. It caused little damage and no injuries, but the 2008 explosion left an enduring mystery about who set it off, and why. The attack bore close similarities to two earlier bombings at high-profile Manhattan locations: All occurred around the same time of night, and in each case the assailant was seen biking from the scene, wearing a sweatshirt that hid his face.

There has not been a similar attack since, and for seven years, the bomber, as well as any possible accomplices, have remained at large. But on Wednesday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that progress had been made. Investigators said that "several persons of interest" had been identified in the 2008 bombing and that all three attacks were now believed to be linked. Now, investigators say they need the public's help to capitalize on the breakthrough.

Read more: New York Times

A 20-year-old Kansas man allegedly joined the U.S. Army last year so he could launch an ISIS-inspired attack on American soldiers like the deadly strike on Ft. Hood, Texas, in 2009, federal authorities announced today.  John T. Booker of Topeka, Kansas, was arrested after a lengthy FBI investigation and was charged with attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction, attempt to provide material support to ISIS, and attempt to destroy U.S. property, officials said.

Booker enlisted on Feb. 7, 2014, and was due to ship to basic training on April 7, 2014. However, his enlistment was terminated on March 24, 2014, at the request of the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation Command because of Booker allegedly making statements that he intended to harm federal personnel.  Since then, he developed a plan to launch a car bomb attack on a military installation in Kansas, prosecutors allege.  He's the latest alleged ISIS sympathizer nabbed by the FBI following a string of arrests involving Americans allegedly plotting to join ISIS overseas or launch attacks on their behalf here in the U.S.

Read more:  ABC News

A 67-year-old Roswell man claimed he was only trying to be a “patriot” when he planted a bomb at a local park, according to a federal complaint against him.  Michael C. Sibley, 67, was arrested Saturday for allegedly leaving an explosive device at Vickory Creek Park in November, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.  “The defendant allegedly placed a bag containing what appeared to be pipe bombs in Vickery Creek Park,” Horn said in an emailed statement. “This arrest should reassure the community that serious crimes like this will be investigated thoroughly and all leads followed to identify the perpetrator.”

A mother and daughter walking in the park spotted the backpack Nov. 4 and called police, an FBI spokesman previously said. The Cobb County police bomb squad was called to the scene.  Inside the backpack, investigators found materials to make a bomb. The items detonated, according to police.  The backpack also contained an Atlanta Falcons schedule, a MARTA schedule and other papers, books and clothing, investigators said Monday.

Read more: Atlanta Journal Constitution

A Utah man accused of wanting to kill police officers and blow up a police station to trigger an uprising against the government has pleaded guilty to a felony charge.

John Huggins entered the plea to possession of an unregistered destructive device in Salt Lake City federal court last week in a plea agreement. In return, prosecutors dropped felony charges of possession of explosives by a restricted person and unlawful distribution of information about making explosive devices.  Huggins faces up to 10 years in prison when he's sentenced May 14, the Standard-Examiner newspaper of Ogden reported

He was arrested in July after police received a tip from a "concerned citizen" that Huggins talked about assassinating two officers and blowing up the police station in his hometown of Tremonton, which is about 75 miles north of Salt Lake City. He also threatened to blow up bridges and other infrastructure to prevent emergency responders from being able to help, according to court records.

Read more: KSL