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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: cyber threats

Steven Stalinsky is the executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute and the author of “American Traitor: The Rise and Fall of al Qaeda’s U.S.-born Leader Adam Gadahn.”

On Nov. 26 in a federal court in New York, 27-year-old Zoobia Shahnaz pleaded guilty to financially supporting the Islamic State terrorist group with a scheme that employed money laundering and bank fraud, along with bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, according to prosecutors. She was tripped up when law enforcement officials detected overseas wire transfers designed to avoid financial-reporting requirements.

Cryptocurrency has come to terrorism, with an array of terrorist organizations exploiting the anonymity afforded by blockchain technology for fundraising and finances, yet U.S. counterterrorism officials appear to have been slow to grasp the extent the problem.

Read more: The Washington Post

YouTube took down more than 58 million videos and 224 million comments during the third quarter based on violations of its policies, the unit of Alphabet Inc.’s Google said on Thursday in an effort to demonstrate progress in suppressing problem content.

Government officials and interest groups in the United States, Europe and Asia have been pressuring YouTube, Facebook Inc. and other social media services to quickly identify and remove extremist and hateful content that critics have said incite violence.

The European Union has proposed online services should face steep fines unless they remove extremist material within one hour of a government order to do so.

Read more: The Globe and Mail (Canada)

The head of one of Australia's secretive intelligence agencies has struck out at critics of Australia's freshly minted encryption laws, saying those claiming the new regime is dangerous are "hyperbolic, inaccurate and influenced by self-interest".

In a rare, public statement, Mike Burgess has struck out at seven "myths", asserting it was important to correct the record and assure Australians on how the laws would work in practice.

Mr Burgess, the director-general of the Australian Signals Directorate, said the Telecommunications and Other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Act 2018, or TOLA Act, which Parliament approved last week, was "highly targeted" and directed at terrorists, paedophiles and criminals, not law-abiding Australians.

Read more: ABC News (Australia)

As U.S. President Donald Trump re-imposed harsh economic sanctions on Iran last month, hackers scrambled to break into personal emails of American officials tasked with enforcing them, The Associated Press has found — another sign of how deeply cyberespionage is embedded into the fabric of US-Iranian relations.

The AP drew on data gathered by the London-based cybersecurity group Certfa to track how a hacking group often nicknamed Charming Kitten spent the past month trying to break into the private emails of more than a dozen U.S. Treasury officials. Also on the hackers' hit list: high-profile defenders, detractors and enforcers of the nuclear deal struck between Washington and Tehran, as well as Arab atomic scientists, Iranian civil society figures and D.C. think tank employees.

Read more: ABC News

Moscow’s latest tourist attraction, a cable car over the Moskva River, has been shut the day after it opened because of what the operator said was a cyberattack.

The gondola takes passengers from the Sparrow Hills overlooking the Russian capital to the Luzhniki sports stadium where the soccer World Cup final was held this summer.

It opened to the public on Tuesday, with rides to be free for the first month, but suddenly halted the next day because of what the operator called a cyberattack on its servers.

Read more: Reuters