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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: cyber threats

Canada announced funding and other initiatives on Wednesday to counter violent extremist content online by teaming with major technology companies Twitter, Facebook, Microsoft and Alphabet's Google.

Public Safety Canada said in a statement the government will commit up to C$1 million ($762,428) to the Tech Against Terrorism program to create a digital database that will notify smaller companies when terrorist content is detected and help eliminate it.

The initiatives follow the Christchurch Call to Action, a non-binding agreement formed after the Christchurch shooting in March to "eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online." Canada joined the Christchurch Call to Action in May.

Read more: US News & World Report

Pro-tip: If you find a note with the words “al-Qaeda” and a sketchy web address, don’t go to the website.

Hancock County sheriff’s officials posted to Facebook on Friday about an apparent spam that installs malware on computers or other electronic devises when opened.

The malware is disguised as a website, sheriff’s officials said in the post.

Residents told deputies that a white van is dropping off clear bags of rocks in their yards. Inside, a note claiming a group called ALPHA is responsible for the deaths caused by the Haiti earthquake in 2010 and the 2014 tsunami in Sri Lanka.

Read more: Sun Herald

A hacker group has posted online the personal information of hundreds of federal agents and police officers apparently stolen from websites affiliated with alumni of the FBI's National Academy.

The Associated Press counted at least 1,400 unique records of employees of the FBI, Secret Service, Capital Police, and other federal agencies as well as police and sheriffs' deputies in North Carolina and Florida.

The information appears to come from the websites of three local chapters of the FBI National Academy Associates, which claims 17,000 members nationwide.

Read more: Business Insider

Steven Stalinsky is the executive director of the Middle East Media Research Institute and the author of “American Traitor: The Rise and Fall of al Qaeda’s U.S.-born Leader Adam Gadahn.”

On Nov. 26 in a federal court in New York, 27-year-old Zoobia Shahnaz pleaded guilty to financially supporting the Islamic State terrorist group with a scheme that employed money laundering and bank fraud, along with bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, according to prosecutors. She was tripped up when law enforcement officials detected overseas wire transfers designed to avoid financial-reporting requirements.

Cryptocurrency has come to terrorism, with an array of terrorist organizations exploiting the anonymity afforded by blockchain technology for fundraising and finances, yet U.S. counterterrorism officials appear to have been slow to grasp the extent the problem.

Read more: The Washington Post

YouTube took down more than 58 million videos and 224 million comments during the third quarter based on violations of its policies, the unit of Alphabet Inc.’s Google said on Thursday in an effort to demonstrate progress in suppressing problem content.

Government officials and interest groups in the United States, Europe and Asia have been pressuring YouTube, Facebook Inc. and other social media services to quickly identify and remove extremist and hateful content that critics have said incite violence.

The European Union has proposed online services should face steep fines unless they remove extremist material within one hour of a government order to do so.

Read more: The Globe and Mail (Canada)