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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: cyber threats

The maritime sector might be a long way behind airlines and integrators when it comes to embracing the digital world. But it is catching up quickly as new satellite systems enable the real-time networking of fleets.

And, according to former naval personnel and security experts speaking at London International Shipping Week, as shipping embraces digitalization, criminal hackers and hostile nation state actors will step up efforts to target the weakest links in the supply chain, threatening the national security of the U.S. and other countries.

Tipping his hat to UPS Inc (NYSE: UPS) and its vast fleets of integrated and digitally transparent delivery vans fitted with advanced telematics and operated as a network, Dr Martin Stopford, Clarksons Platou, said Silicon Valley had made plug and play logistics possible on land. "The shipping industry is a very long way behind that," he told delegates at a cybersecurity seminar hosted by law firm Hill Dickinson on September 10.

Read more: Yahoo News

Alphabet Inc’s Google, Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc will testify next week before a U.S. Senate panel on efforts by social media firms to remove violent content from online platforms, the panel said in a statement on Wednesday.

The Sept. 18 hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee follows growing concern in Congress about the use of social media by people committing mass shootings and other violent acts. Last week, the owner of 8chan, an online message board linked to several recent mass shootings, gave a deposition on Capitol Hill.

The hearing “will examine the proliferation of extremism online and explore the effectiveness of industry efforts to remove violent content from online platforms. Witnesses will discuss how technology companies are working with law enforcement when violent or threatening content is identified and the processes for removal of such content,” the committee said.

Read more: Reuters

The Department of Homeland Security stored sensitive data from the nation’s bioterrorism defense program on an insecure website where it was vulnerable to attacks by hackers for over a decade, according to government documents reviewed by The Times.

The data included the locations of at least some BioWatch air samplers, which are installed at subway stations and other public locations in more than 30 U.S. cities and are designed to detect anthrax or other airborne biological weapons, Homeland Security officials confirmed. It also included the results of tests for possible pathogens, a list of biological agents that could be detected and response plans that would be put in place in the event of an attack.

The information — housed on a dot-org website run by a private contractor — has been moved behind a secure federal government firewall, and the website was shut down in May. But Homeland Security officials acknowledge they do not know whether hackers ever gained access to the data.

Read more: Los Angeles Times

The online message board 8chan, which has been linked to three mass shootings in 2019, will be terminated, Cloudfare announced late Sunday night, just hours after the site's founder called for its end.

Cloudfare will cut off services for 8chan at midnight PDT, CEO Matthew Prince said in a statement, though he noted that another network provider could bring 8chan back online. That's what happened in 2017, when Cloudfare booted The Daily Stormer, a neo-Nazi message board.

"The rationale is simple: they have proven themselves to be lawless and that lawlessness has caused multiple tragic deaths," Prince said. "Even if 8chan may not have violated the letter of the law in refusing to moderate their hate-filled community, they have created an environment that revels in violating its spirit."

Read more: USA Today

Canada announced funding and other initiatives on Wednesday to counter violent extremist content online by teaming with major technology companies Twitter, Facebook, Microsoft and Alphabet's Google.

Public Safety Canada said in a statement the government will commit up to C$1 million ($762,428) to the Tech Against Terrorism program to create a digital database that will notify smaller companies when terrorist content is detected and help eliminate it.

The initiatives follow the Christchurch Call to Action, a non-binding agreement formed after the Christchurch shooting in March to "eliminate terrorist and violent extremist content online." Canada joined the Christchurch Call to Action in May.

Read more: US News & World Report