Skip Navigation

Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Keyword: critical infrastructure

A man has been charged with criminal mischief after police say he tampered with multiple communication towers in the Austin area.

Officials are calling it an "extremely rare" case because, typically, this kind of crime is usually tied to some sort of theft. But, in suspect Derek Phillips' case, it appears his sole purpose was to cause the towers to stop functioning properly.

Police began investigating on Aug. 12 after it appeared someone attempted to disable a number of towers in southwest Austin that possibly provided emergency communicators for the FBI and Department of Homeland Security, in addition to emergency communications of the City of Austin and Austin Police Department.

Read more: KVUE

There are no indications that an explosion at a waste disposal facility in Austria which injured five people on Thursday was caused by a terrorist attack, a police spokesman said.

Police in Upper Austria province said in a statement that two people were seriously hurt in the explosion in the town of Hoersching that happened shortly after 8 a.m. local time (0600 GMT).

Read more: Reuters

Aircraft security is under the spotlight after the U.S. government confirmed a move to protect citizens from cyberattacks targeting aviation. It comes amid growing concern that aviation is a major target for terrorists, who could use cyberattacks to threaten planes and passengers.

The Department of Home Security is leading the revived program alongside the Pentagon and Transportation Department that aims to test airliners’ vulnerability to hacking, according to the Wall Street Journal. Few details are available, but DHS confirmed that the program would include testing actual aircraft for vulnerabilities.

The program is focusing on protecting the electronic systems of new and old airliners from cyberattacks. Concerns have been growing after cyberattacks on other connected so-called critical infrastructure such as power grids. A U.S. government program is in place to focus on power grids via the SEIA Bill, which mandates the use of specific technologies to help protect the systems underpinning them.

Read more: Forbes

An American Airlines mechanic accused of sabotaging a navigation system on a flight with 150 people aboard at Miami International Airport was denied bond by a federal judge on Wednesday after prosecutors suggested he may have links to a Middle East terrorist organization.

Abdul-Majeed Marouf Ahmed Alani, a 60-year-old veteran employee, told investigators after his arrest earlier this month that he disabled the system because he was upset over stalled union contract negotiations with the airline and wanted to generate some overtime for maintenance on the plane. He said he meant no harm to anyone, and the July 17 flight was aborted before takeoff after an error alert appeared on the navigation system.

But federal prosecutors revealed new information about possible motives that prompted Magistrate Judge Chris McAliley to keep Alani behind bars, ruling that he posed a danger to the community and a flight risk.

Read more: Miami Herald

The Department of Homeland Security stored sensitive data from the nation’s bioterrorism defense program on an insecure website where it was vulnerable to attacks by hackers for over a decade, according to government documents reviewed by The Times.

The data included the locations of at least some BioWatch air samplers, which are installed at subway stations and other public locations in more than 30 U.S. cities and are designed to detect anthrax or other airborne biological weapons, Homeland Security officials confirmed. It also included the results of tests for possible pathogens, a list of biological agents that could be detected and response plans that would be put in place in the event of an attack.

The information — housed on a dot-org website run by a private contractor — has been moved behind a secure federal government firewall, and the website was shut down in May. But Homeland Security officials acknowledge they do not know whether hackers ever gained access to the data.

Read more: Los Angeles Times