Skip Navigation

Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Sep 6, 2019

A Russian national and an Italian national have been charged in the United States with conspiring and attempting to steal trade secrets from an American aviation company.

Alexander Yuryevich Korshunov, 57, and Maurizio Paolo Bianchi, 59, were charged by a criminal complaint on Aug. 21.  Korshunov was arrested on Aug. 30 at Naples International Airport in Italy.  The complaint was unsealed today.

According to the affidavit filed in support of the criminal complaint, Korshunov was an employee of a Russian state-owned company and had previously been a Russian public official whose service included the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Bianchi was a former director at an Italian subsidiary of GE Aviation, one of the world’s top aircraft engine suppliers, which is headquartered in the Southern District of Ohio.  While working for the subsidiary, Bianchi was responsible for business in China, Russia and Asia.

Read more: DOJ

The government’s watchlist of more than 1 million people identified as “known or suspected terrorists” violates the constitutional rights of those placed on it, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

The ruling from U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga grants summary judgment to nearly two dozen Muslim U.S. citizens who had challenged the watchlist with the help of a Muslim civil-rights group, the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

But the judge is seeking additional legal briefs before deciding what remedy to impose.

Read more: AP

Days after Sudanese soldiers massacred pro-democracy demonstrators in Khartoum in June, an obscure digital marketing company in Cairo began deploying keyboard warriors to a second front: a covert operation to praise Sudan’s military on social media.

The Egyptian company, run by a former military officer and self-described expert on “internet warfare,” paid new recruits $180 a month to write pro-military messages using fake accounts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Telegram. Instructors provided hashtags and talking points.

Since the ouster of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir in April, new employees were told, protesters had sown chaos in Sudan. Their demands for democracy were premature and dangerous. Order had to be restored.

“We’re at war,” an instructor told the new employees. “Security is weak. The army has to rule for now.”

Covert influence campaigns have become a favored tool of leaders in countries like China and Russia, where manipulation of social media complements strongarm tactics on the streets. In the Middle East, though, those campaigns are being coordinated across borders in an effort to bolster authoritarian rule and douse the kind of popular protests that gave rise to the Arab Spring in 2011.

Read more: New York Times

German police registered a total of 609 attacks on asylum-seekers and refugees during the first half of 2019, according to the Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung. The newspaper cited an answer given by the German federal government in response to a question by the parliamentary group of the Left party.

The crimes ranged from verbal insult and harassment to arson and dangerous bodily harm.

According to the report, there were 60 attacks on refugee shelters and 42 attacks on aid organizations or volunteers. 102 people were injured, including seven children. Authorities have designated all of them as "politically motivated right-wing crimes."

The report stated that one in four attacks took place in the state of Brandenburg, which surrounds the country's capital, Berlin. Police recorded 160 offenses targeting refugees or asylum-seekers in the state.

There were 62 assaults in Baden-Württemberg, 58 in Lower Saxony and 56 in Saxony.

Read more: Deutsche Welle