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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Jun 14, 2019

A man accused of being one of the ringleaders behind the Easter Sunday bomb attacks that killed more than 250 people in Sri Lanka on April 21 has been arrested, Interpol said Friday.

Ahamed Milhan Hayathu Mohamed, a 29-year-old Sri Lankan national, was arrested in the Middle East and has been extradited to Sri Lanka.

Interpol said he and four other men connected to the bombings were en route from Saudi Arabia to the Sri Lankan capital Colombo.

"The arrest and extradition of one of the key suspects in the Sri Lanka bomb attacks is an important step in the ongoing investigation, and one which Interpol is proud to have supported," Secretary General Jürgen Stock said.

Read more: Deutsche Welle

Olowan Magarang recalls the moment he knew it was time to flee his home in Marawi, on the southern Philippines' island of Mindanao. It was in May 2017, two days into a siege by militants aligned with the Islamic State.

"I spotted ISIS fighters moving up my brother's four-story house, carrying long guns and high-caliber weapons," he says.

Magarang was living in what became ground zero — the epicenter of months of fighting — when Philippine troops waged house-to-house combat against hundreds of ISIS-affiliated fighters in Marawi.

Authorities allowed him to see the ruins of his concrete house for the first time last August.

Read more: NPR

French police have smashed a neo-Nazi cell accused of plotting attacks on Jewish or Muslim places of worship, legal sources said Tuesday.

Five members of the group, who were “close in ideology to the neo-Nazi movement” were charged between September and May over the alleged plot, a source close to the investigation said.

“The investigation suggested they were developing an ill-defined plot to carry out an attack, likely to target a place of worship,” the judicial source said.

The sources gave no details of specific targets or motives.

Read more: France 24

Two years ago, Pentagon officials said that American forces in the remote reaches of Afghanistan could defeat the Islamic State’s offshoot here by the end of 2017.

This month, American Special Forces in eastern Afghanistan were still fighting, with no end in sight.

During a visit by a New York Times reporter to their dusty army outpost, in the eastern province of Nangarhar, the Americans pointed out the ridges and valleys at the foot of the snow-capped Spin Ghar mountains: There, they noted, was the start of the Islamic State’s territory, in some of the most forbidding terrain in Afghanistan.

Read more: New York Times