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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Jun 10, 2019

Nearly 100 people have been killed in an attack in a village in central Mali inhabited by the Dogon ethnic group, officials say.

The attack happened in Sobame Da, near Sanga town in the Mopti region.

The search for bodies is ongoing, but officials say 95 people have been found dead, with many of the bodies burned.

There have been numerous attacks in Mali in recent months, some ethnically driven, some carried out by jihadist groups.

Clashes between Dogon hunters and semi-nomadic Fulani herders are frequent.

Mali's government said "suspected terrorists" had attacked the village at around 03:00 local time. At least 19 people were still missing, it said.

But the mayor of nearby Bankass, Moulaye Guindo, told Reuters news agency that Fulanis from that district had attacked Sobane-Kou after nightfall.

"About 50 heavily armed men arrived on motorbikes and pickups," a survivor who called himself Amadou Togo told the AFP agency. "They first surrounded the village and then attacked – anyone who tried to escape was killed."

"No-one was spared – women, children, elderly people," he added.

Read more: BBC News

The man accused of carrying out the twin massacres at New Zealand mosques in March will become the first suspect charged under the country’s anti-terrorism laws passed after the 9/11 attacks.

The decision will be closely watched around the world as a test of bypassing regular criminal statutes for an apparent hate crime and opting for terrorist charges, which opens the door for examinations of ideology and political motivations during the trial.

Critics say a prosecution case based on “engaging in a terrorist act” would add no more years to the possible sentence for the suspect, 28-year-old Brenton Tarrant.

Read more: The Washington Post

The Islamic State group has lost its caliphate in Syria and Iraq, but in the forbidding mountains of northeastern Afghanistan the group is expanding its footprint, recruiting new fighters and plotting attacks on the United States and other Western countries, according to U.S. and Afghan security officials.

Nearly two decades after the U.S.-led invasion, the extremist group is seen as an even greater threat than the Taliban because of its increasingly sophisticated military capabilities and its strategy of targeting civilians, both in Afghanistan and abroad. Concerns run so deep that many have come to see the Taliban, which have also clashed with IS, as a potential partner in containing it.

Read more: AP

Bulgarian officials said on Saturday that they had arrested and charged a 16-year-old student who had been radicalized by the Islamic State with planning a terrorist attack.

The Islamic State had recruited the teenager, who is from Plovdiv, in a process that started over social media, Deputy Prosecutor General Ivan Geshev said Saturday at a news conference in Sofia, Bulgaria’s capital.

“This is a classic example of recruitment and radicalization of an individual, in this case an underage person,” he told reporters, describing the case as a “personal tragedy.”

Read more: New York Times

Like many other communities across America, the Flathead Valley has experienced periodic incidents linked to hatred and extremism, but a report and new tracking map from a national legal advocacy organization show most local designated hate groups share one telling trait: they eventually fizzle out.

The consistency in hate groups’ inabilities to gain a foothold in the valley is underpinned on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s most recent “hate map” — a tool released by the nonprofit on an annual basis that identifies groups they designate to be hate groups. As defined by the organization, hate groups are made up of individuals who have “beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics.”

The map shows which groups exist in each state and, more specifically, which groups linger in each local community. It is typically released before March of every year and is compiled by researchers, analysts and others who track the activity of more than 1,000 hate groups across the nation.

Read more: Daily Inter Lake