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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Mar 19, 2019

Several ISIS terrorists tied to a January suicide bombing in Syria that killed four Americans were captured by U.S.-backed forces, a defense official confirmed to Fox News on Tuesday.

It was not immediately known how many ISIS fighters have been captured in all, the official said, adding the details are still "vague."

A defense official told Reuters the number people detained was in the "single digits," while another official told the news agency several people were detained in February.

Read more: Fox News

The spokesman of the Islamic State emerged from nearly six months of silence on Monday to mock America’s assertion of having defeated the group and to call for retaliation over last week’s mosque attacks in New Zealand.

“The scenes of the massacres in the two mosques should wake up those who were fooled, and should incite the supporters of the caliphate to avenge their religion,” the spokesman, Abu Hassan al-Muhajir, said in a 44-minute audio recording.

Mr. al-Muhajir portrayed the shootings by a white extremist, which killed 50 Muslims as they prayed in the city of Christchurch, as an extension of the campaign against the Islamic State. He likened the mosque attacks to the weekslong battle raging in the last village under ISIS control in Syria.

Read more: New York Times

The leafy New Zealand city where a self-proclaimed racist fatally shot 50 people at mosques during Friday prayers is known for its picturesque meandering river and English heritage. For decades, Christchurch has also been the center of the country’s small but persistent white supremacist movement.

An expert on such fringe groups says it’s probably more than coincidence that the accused mosque shooter, 28-year-old Australian Brenton Tarrant, settled in the region, known for a whiter demographic than the country’s north, after frequently traveling abroad in 2016-2018 in what appears to have been an extreme-right pilgrimage.

He went mostly to areas of Europe with a long history of sectarian dispute, including clashes between Renaissance Europe and the Ottoman Empire and the breakup of Yugoslavia following its ethnic and religious conflicts.

Read more: AP

A 20-year-old Georgia woman has been charged with helping ISIS by posting a "kill list" online that included the names of State Department employees and American soldiers, according to federal prosecutors in the Southern District of New York.

According to the indictment unsealed last week, Kim Anh Vo joined the United Cyber Caliphate in 2016 -- a group that authorities said pledged allegiance to ISIS and was committed to carrying out online attacks and cyber intrusions against Americans.

Vo is accused of working with the UCC to recruit a minor in Norway and others to "create online content in support of ISIS," a DOJ release said.

She was known as "F@ng," "Zozo" or "Miss.Bones" online, according to the government.

Read more: ABC News

The United States and its closest allies have spent nearly two decades building an elaborate system to share intelligence about international terrorist groups, and it has become a key pillar of a global effort to thwart attacks.

But there’s no comparable arrangement for sharing intelligence about domestic terrorist organizations, including right-wing extremists like the one suspected in the killing of 50 worshipers at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, according to current and former national security officials and counterterrorism experts.

Governments generally see nationalist extremist groups as a problem for domestic law enforcement and security agencies to confront. In the United States, that responsibility falls principally to the FBI.

Read more: Washington Post