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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Mar 12, 2019

In April 2016, VO joined the United Cyber Caliphate (the “UCC”), an online group that pledged allegiance to ISIS and committed to carrying out online attacks and cyber intrusions against Americans.  Since that time, the UCC and its sub-groups have disseminated ISIS propaganda online, including “kill lists,” which listed the names of individuals – for example, soldiers in the United States Armed Forces and members of the State Department – whom the group instructed their followers to kill.  For example, on or about April 21, 2016, the UCC posted online the names, addresses, and other personal identifying information of approximately 3,602 individuals in the New York City area and included a message that stated:  “List of most important citizens of #New York and #Brooklyn and some other cities . . . We Want them #Dead.” 

Between April 2016 and May 2017, VO worked on behalf of the UCC to recruit others to join the group and assist with the group’s hacking efforts.  Between January and February 2017, VO recruited other individuals – including a minor residing in Norway – to create online content in support of ISIS, including a video (“Video-1”) threating a non-profit organization based in New York, New York, which was formed to find and combat the online promotion of extremist ideologies.  Video-1 contained messages such as, “You messed with the Islamic State, SO EXPECT US SOON,” followed by a scene displaying a photograph of the organization’s chief executive officer and former U.S. Ambassador (the “CEO”), along with the words:  “[CEO], we will get you.”

On or about April 2, 2017, the UCC posted online a kill list containing the names and personal identifying information of over 8,000 individuals, along with links to another video (“Video-2”).  Video-2 displayed messages stating, in part:  “We have a message to the people of the U.S., and most importantly, your president Trump:  Know that we continue to wage war against you, know that your counter attacks only makes stronger.  The UCC will start a new step in this war against you. . . .” and “We will release a list with over 8000 names, addresses, and email addresses, of those who fight against the US.  Or live amongst the kuffar.  Kill them wherever you find them!”  In subsequent scenes, Video-2 contains what appears to be a graphic depiction of the decapitation of a kneeling man. 

VO, 20, of Georgia, is charged with one count of conspiring to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization, which carries a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.  The maximum potential sentence in this case is prescribed by Congress and is provided here for informational purposes only, as any sentencing of the defendant will be determined by a judge.

Read more: Department of Justice

A U.S. Coast Guard lieutenant was arraigned Monday on gun and drug charges in a case authorities say linked him to a plot to killed several prominent Democrats and broadcast journalists.

Christopher Hasson, 49, pleaded not guilty to charges of illegal possession of firearm silencers, possession of firearms by a drug addict and unlawful user, and possession of a controlled substance.

Hasson was arrested last month in the parking lot of the Coast Guard headquarters where he had worked for three years. A search of his Silver Spring, Md., apartment turned up 15 firearms, including seven rifles, and over 1,000 rounds of ammunition.

Read more: NPR

Police say a man in Bradley County made an explosive device and told his brother he was going to blow everyone up.

The Bradley County Sheriff's Office says they responded to John Burchfield's home on Rose Avenue last year in November.

He told deputies he made a device to scare off the demons that were after him.

Investigators say the device had all of the components of an explosive device but lacked a detonator.

Read more: WRCB TV

Across the islands of the southern Philippines, the black flag of the Islamic State is flying over what the group considers its East Asia province.

Men in the jungle, two oceans away from the arid birthplace of the Islamic State, are taking the terrorist brand name into new battles.

As worshipers gathered in January for Sunday Mass at a Catholic cathedral, two bombs ripped through the church compound, killing 23 people. The Islamic State claimed a pair of its suicide bombers had caused the carnage.

Read more: New York Times

Only one month ago, Narendra Modi, India’s once unstoppable prime minister, seemed surprisingly vulnerable going into his re-election campaign.

Economic growth had been slowing, thousands of farmers were marching on the capital (some even dumped gallons of nearly worthless milk in the streets), and unemployment had hit its worst level in 45 years — an unpleasant fact that Mr. Modi’s government tried to hide.

In a recent batch of critical state elections, his party got trounced. And with the country’s weekslong election process set to begin on April 11, the rejuvenated opposition was landing punch after punch with corruption allegations.

But one bombing in Kashmir, and weeks of military brinkmanship with Pakistan afterward, appears to have interrupted Mr. Modi’s slump.

Read more: New York Times