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Terrorism News

A collection of open-source terrorism news from around the world.
Date: Feb 11, 2019

A new survey has found rising concerns about climate change, the "Islamic State" and cyberattacks. But more people now see US power and influence as a threat, marking a significant rise from only two years ago.

A 26-country survey published on Monday found that a majority of countries see climate change "as the top international threat." Terrorism, especially the kind perpetrated by the "Islamic State" militant group, came up as the second-highest threat, topping security concerns in eight of the countries surveyed in the Pew Research Center study.

China's power and influence was at the bottom of the threat list, which included cyberattacks, North Korea's nuclear program and the condition of the global economy. Meanwhile, more people now believe US power and influence is a major threat to their country compared to similar surveys conducted in 2013 and 2017.

Read more: Deutsche Welle

U.S. counter-terrorism missions will soon place more emphasis on a little-known Pentagon program designed to help “surrogate forces,” rather than traditional allied units that are dependent on U.S. training, advice and assistance.

The shift comes as the Defense Department implements the 2018 National Defense Strategy, which prioritizes near-peer adversaries like China and Russia ahead of violent extremist organizations like the Islamic State.

“This evolving counter-terrorism [CT] operation construct will place even greater emphasis on successful programs, such as the 127 Echo program, which provides us viable surrogate forces designed to achieve U.S. CT objectives at relatively low cost in terms of resources and especially risk to our personnel,” Maj. Gen. James Hecker, vice director for operations from the joint staff, said during a congressional testimony Wednesday.

Read more: Military Times

A surge in violent attacks linked to Islamist groups in West Africa’s Sahel region reflects their growing capabilities and networking abilities, according to an international security conference report.

Three-quarters of battles with state security forces during 2018 were initiated by the groups, it said, according to extracts from the report, prepared for the annual Munich Security Conference and seen by Reuters on Friday.

It cited African Center for Strategic Studies data showing fatalities linked to Islamist militant activity more than doubled from 2017 to 1,082.

Read more: Reuters

A New York City man has been arrested on federal charges of trying to join a Pakistan-based terrorist group.

U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman says 29-year-old Jesus Wilfredo Encarnacion was arrested Thursday as he tried to board a flight to Pakistan at Kennedy Airport.

Berman says Encarnacion was trying to join the militant group Lashkar e-Taiba, which has been blamed for high-profile attacks including the 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed 168 people.

Prosecutors say Encarnacion went online to try to join the terrorist organization. They say he told an undercover FBI agent he was "ready to kill and die in the name of Allah."

Read more: ABC News